Google confirms Top Shot isn't coming to the Pixel 2, despite some seeing "dots" in Motion Photos

When Google introduced Top Shot to the Pixel 3 and 3 XL, it was viewed as a lifesaver for blurry shots, jittery shots, friends who’ve had too many shots (you know who they are), or just bad happenstance. Owners of other Pixel phones were a little jealous and wondered if the feature would ever make it back to their model. Well, the official answer is “no,” but if Pixel 2 and 2 XL owners happen to receive a Motion Photo taken on a Pixel 3, they should be able to see and save those Top Shots. Read MoreGoogle confirms Top Shot isn’t coming to the Pixel 2, despite some seeing “dots” in Motion Photos was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Chrome will soon support dark themes in websites

Web browsers currently handle dark mode in one of two ways. Some of them, like Samsung Browser, simply invert the colors of the web page. This sometimes breaks the site’s design, but it works universally. Another approach is to let sites know that dark mode is activated, and let them use an alternative theme. Chrome appears to be joining the latter camp, as the browser’s development team announced support the ‘prefers-color-scheme’ browser feature. Read MoreChrome will soon support dark themes in websites was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Ryan Reynolds immortalizes himself in digital art as a new Pokemon Detective Pikachu AR Playmoji

Tomorrow, Japanese moviegoers will be able to get their tickets punched for “Pokemon Detective Pikachu,” the first live-action film based on the franchise. Select theaters in the United States will have screenings starting May 9. But if you want to get acquainted with the three-dimensional fluffball that is Ryan Reynolds… I mean, Pikachu, you can do so with Google’s latest Playmoji pack for Playground.

You’ll be able to pull up Detective Pikachu, Charizard, Jigglypuff, and Mr. Read MoreRyan Reynolds immortalizes himself in digital art as a new Pokemon Detective Pikachu AR Playmoji was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google introduces location data auto delete feature

Google storing your location data is a blessing and a curse. Of course, it is optional and you can turn it off any time, but then many of our favorite features wouldn’t work. Things like restaurant recommendations, search results, Google Timeline and more are all thanks to your location data being stored.
However, having all that data stored by Google is scary. Everywhere you’ve been, everything you’ve searched for in the last decade is all on a server. While Google is a relatively secure company, anything can happen and that info could be stolen. Is it that important? Not really, but it’s definitely eerie. If you don’t believe us, check out Google Timeline and scroll back a few years.
Thankfully, Google is now giving us an “in-between” for those who are privacy-focused but still want to take advantage of the aforementioned features. The company is adding a new auto-delete option that will delete your activity data either every 3 months or every 18 months. This allows you to enjoy the short term benefits of location data without having it permanently stored by Google.
Choose a time limit for how long you want your activity data to be saved—3 or 18 months—and any data older than that will be automatically deleted from your account on an ongoing basis. These controls are coming first to Location History and Web & App Activity and will roll out in the coming weeks.
We think this is a fantastic move, especially in our current times where security is being taken more and more seriously. The feature will be rolling out in the coming weeks so keep an eye out in the Location History menu in Google settings for the prompt!

Source: Google Blog

Google teases new “Tiles” in Wear OS video

Wear OS isn’t exactly getting the love it deserves from Google, though the latest interface redesign was a big step in the right direction. However, the company isn’t done with our favorite smartwatch operating system, as an even newer interface update is coming soon.
This update will introduce “Tiles”, which are cards to the sides of the watchface. You can swipe side to side to see bit of data like texts, news, weather, flight data, Google Fit, and more. You can also rearrange these Tiles by holding and dragging, making your favorites easier to access.
This will replace the current interface, where a swipe left will reveal Google Fit and a swipe right reveals Assistant. This brings it more in line with Huawei’s LiteOS on the Watch GT, which features almost identical data cards accessible by swiping away from the watch face.
We’ll be getting more details about this new feature at Google I/O next week, and it should be rolling out over the next month. You probably won’t see it for a little while, and we don’t know what watches it will come to, but we hope to see it on older models that got the UI redesign last year. Take a look at this video which showcases the tiles at the end.

Source: Google
Via: Droid-Life

The story of how a conspiracy inside YouTube helped kill Internet Explorer 6

Back in 2009, the Internet was a different place. The iPhone was just two years old, and the first Android phone, the T-Mobile G1, just saw the light of day. Most people accessed the web primarily through their desktop machines, and a significant portion of them never bothered to update their aging Internet Explorer 6 – much to the dismay of many web developers. Then, in a sudden change, usage of the browser went down as Google started to pull support for the browser. Read MoreThe story of how a conspiracy inside YouTube helped kill Internet Explorer 6 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google Pixel 3a could be cheaper than we previously thought

We had earlier made the argument that for $500 for the Pixel 3a, it was simply not worth it as it was just about $100-$150 shy of buying a phone with much better specs, but at the same time, maybe for some, the difference in price is simply too much for them to even consider. Turns out there might be some good news after all.
In a video uploaded by YouTube channel This Is Tech Today, they claim that they have gotten word on how much the upcoming Pixel 3a smartphones could cost, with the Pixel 3a priced starting at $399, while the larger Pixel 3a XL could be priced starting at $479.
With a base price of $399, it sure makes it an even more compelling handset. It is unclear if these were always the prices that Google was planning to charge, or if Google realized that $500 was a bit too expensive for customers to justify, especially when they can simply top up more money to get the Pixel 3.

Either way, we will learn more on the 7th of May which is when Google is expected to officially launch the device, so be sure to check back with us then if you’d like all the official details. In the meantime, here are several reasons to get excited for the Pixel 3a, and you can check out the video below if you’d like more details about the upcoming handset.

Chrome OS 74 hits the stable branch, brings audio output support for Linux apps and more

A new Chrome OS stable version is always fun. This is v74, which brings with it, among other things, audio output support for Linux applications (yay) and USB camera support for the Android Camera app. You can find the full changelog below.

New Features

Send system performance profiling data along with feedback reports
Linux apps can output audio
USB camera support for the Android Camera app
Removal of deprecated supervised users
[Accessibility] ChromeVox developer log options: There are now a number of developer options available within the ChromeVox Options page which enable developers to turn on logging for speech and other items
Support for new files and folders under the “My files” local root
Users can quickly access their most recent apps and Google searches by clicking on the search box
Annotate documents from the Chrome PDF Viewer

Security Improvements

The SafeSetID LSM has been added to Chrome OS and the Linux kernel. Read MoreChrome OS 74 hits the stable branch, brings audio output support for Linux apps and more was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google Lens support arrives for Japanese

Google has added support for Japanese in Lens, following it being available in Korean for some time (which appeared sometime last summer). In case you didn’t know, Lens is basically the successor to Goggles from way back in the day. It uses your camera to gather contextual information on what you’re looking at, letting you do a variety of things from translate street signs to shop for something you saw.
If you’re in Japan and/or your phone is set to Japanese, check out Lens in Assistant or in Photos — some OEM cameras like OnePlus also include it for easy access. Read MoreGoogle Lens support arrives for Japanese was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google will now let you auto-delete your location history and web activity

One of the biggest concerns in our modern online era is privacy — that is, how much you want certain corporations to know about your web habits, app usage, and location data. Some people don’t care, others go to extreme lengths to remain anonymous online, and the rest of us fall in the middle. One of the more common concerns is with Google and its nigh monopoly on search and other online products, not to mention how much it knows about us. Read MoreGoogle will now let you auto-delete your location history and web activity was written by the awesome team at Android Police.