Show off your Chrome dino-game skills with the arrival of cross-device high score sync

Since 2014, Chrome has featured a delightful little time waster that kicks in when your device doesn’t have internet access. It’s a game featuring a dinosaur that hops over cacti (and, eventually, other dinosaurs), in which your score increases as you progress through a pixelated desert. Until recently, that score was lost when you stopped playing, but as of Chrome version 72, it’s finally saved — and it even syncs between your devices. Read MoreShow off your Chrome dino-game skills with the arrival of cross-device high score sync was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google plans to eliminate phishing and scam popup ads.

Google will soon take a more aggressive stance when it comes to abusive advertising. Starting in December, Chrome 71 will begin filtering out all ads from websites that are frequently found displaying ads that steal personal data, begin unwanted and unexpected downloads, or redirect a user unwittingly to external sites via pop-up windows. Sites that persistently contain those types of ads, which gain clicks through deceptive practices such as fake “close” buttons or misleading warnings, will be affected by the change.
Website admins and owners will have 30 days to fix or remove ads that are flagged. After that, Chrome 71 will protect users by filtering out all ads on offending websites. The new ad filtering feature will be optional but enabled by default. Those who don’t mind seeing the offending ads can manually enable them in browser’s settings tab.

I can’t see this change coming up against too many objections since the sites that use these offending ads often rely primarily or exclusively on them. Google noted that phishing and scam sites sometimes use these methods to swipe your data.
It’s significant that the company will be stopping all ads based on the methods of a given site, not just the offending ads. Honest advertisers might have a few things to say about the change, but it appears Google is clearly hoping that site owners will adjust their advertising practices before that becomes a significant issue.
Source: Google

Chrome may get a new way to share tabs between mobile and desktop, plus incognito media notification changes

In the dark, dank, early days of Android, sending content from your phone to your desktop required either a third-party tool like Pushbullet or Google’s Chrome to Phone and companion Chrome to Mobile extension. Thankfully Chrome switched to a convenient “tab sync” multi-device history that allows you to share sites across devices easily. Even so, it’s not the most direct system, and according to Chrome Story, a “self share” feature that provides a more obvious workflow may be coming to Chrome. Read MoreChrome may get a new way to share tabs between mobile and desktop, plus incognito media notification changes was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google apps may cost EU phone makers as much as $40 per phone

Two days ago, Google unveiled new licensing terms for Android phones and tablets in the European Union, following the EU’s record $5 billion fine. Device manufacturers can now sell phones with heavily-modified builds of Android while also producing normal Android devices with the Play Store, and some apps (like Chrome and Google Search) are now separate licenses. According to a report from The Verge, device makers are still strongly incentivized to ship Search and Chrome, or they could pay as much as $40 per device for access to the Play Store. Read MoreGoogle apps may cost EU phone makers as much as $40 per phone was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Chrome for Android to end support for Jelly Bean

Android Jelly Bean debuted nearly six years ago in November 2012, and it’s currently the oldest version of Android still getting Chrome updates. That looks to be changing soon, though, according to a new commit spotted by XDA Developers.

The commit’s description puts it pretty bluntly: “Update UI for unsupported Android OS and make Jelly Bean unsupported.” There’s no timeline for the change, but once it takes effect, Android KitKat will replace Jelly Bean as the oldest version still supported by Chrome. Read MoreChrome for Android to end support for Jelly Bean was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Incognito mode in Google Chrome might become 'Private mode'

For privacy-conscious users, Incognito Mode has long been a favorite feature of Google Chrome. It lets you browse the web without maintaining a history or saving information like cookies and form inputs. Other browsers have tended to call it Private Mode, since that’s probably a term more people are familiar with, and it looks like Google might be planning to go down that route too.

A couple of tipsters have noticed that the ‘Open in incognito tab’ option when you long-press a link has been changed to ‘Open in private tab,’ which could signal that Google is about to change things up for everyone. Read MoreIncognito mode in Google Chrome might become ‘Private mode’ was written by the awesome team at Android Police.