Chrome streamlines online payments with syncless Google account integration

The days of pulling out your wallet and tediously typing in credit card numbers are long gone. Google will happily save your card details to make it easier to splurge on internet shopping, and of course, to pay for Google services. Chrome is getting deeper payment integrations, which are now separate from Chrome Sync.

Previously, you could only access saved card information in the browser if Chrome sync was turned on. Read MoreChrome streamlines online payments with syncless Google account integration was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Chrome is testing new media playback controls that can even work with background tabs

 
If you’re playing music or a video in a Chrome tab you’re not looking at and want to pause it, it’s a bit of a hassle: you have to navigate to that tab, press the button, then drudge back to the previous tab. The whole process probably only takes a couple of seconds, but an upcoming change will make it easier. Chrome Canary now has a flag to enable “global media controls” in the toolbar. Read MoreChrome is testing new media playback controls that can even work with background tabs was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Chrome will soon support dark themes in websites

Web browsers currently handle dark mode in one of two ways. Some of them, like Samsung Browser, simply invert the colors of the web page. This sometimes breaks the site’s design, but it works universally. Another approach is to let sites know that dark mode is activated, and let them use an alternative theme. Chrome appears to be joining the latter camp, as the browser’s development team announced support the ‘prefers-color-scheme’ browser feature. Read MoreChrome will soon support dark themes in websites was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

The story of how a conspiracy inside YouTube helped kill Internet Explorer 6

Back in 2009, the Internet was a different place. The iPhone was just two years old, and the first Android phone, the T-Mobile G1, just saw the light of day. Most people accessed the web primarily through their desktop machines, and a significant portion of them never bothered to update their aging Internet Explorer 6 – much to the dismay of many web developers. Then, in a sudden change, usage of the browser went down as Google started to pull support for the browser. Read MoreThe story of how a conspiracy inside YouTube helped kill Internet Explorer 6 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Chrome OS 74 hits the stable branch, brings audio output support for Linux apps and more

A new Chrome OS stable version is always fun. This is v74, which brings with it, among other things, audio output support for Linux applications (yay) and USB camera support for the Android Camera app. You can find the full changelog below.

New Features

Send system performance profiling data along with feedback reports
Linux apps can output audio
USB camera support for the Android Camera app
Removal of deprecated supervised users
[Accessibility] ChromeVox developer log options: There are now a number of developer options available within the ChromeVox Options page which enable developers to turn on logging for speech and other items
Support for new files and folders under the “My files” local root
Users can quickly access their most recent apps and Google searches by clicking on the search box
Annotate documents from the Chrome PDF Viewer

Security Improvements

The SafeSetID LSM has been added to Chrome OS and the Linux kernel. Read MoreChrome OS 74 hits the stable branch, brings audio output support for Linux apps and more was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Show off your Chrome dino-game skills with the arrival of cross-device high score sync

Since 2014, Chrome has featured a delightful little time waster that kicks in when your device doesn’t have internet access. It’s a game featuring a dinosaur that hops over cacti (and, eventually, other dinosaurs), in which your score increases as you progress through a pixelated desert. Until recently, that score was lost when you stopped playing, but as of Chrome version 72, it’s finally saved — and it even syncs between your devices. Read MoreShow off your Chrome dino-game skills with the arrival of cross-device high score sync was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google plans to eliminate phishing and scam popup ads.

Google will soon take a more aggressive stance when it comes to abusive advertising. Starting in December, Chrome 71 will begin filtering out all ads from websites that are frequently found displaying ads that steal personal data, begin unwanted and unexpected downloads, or redirect a user unwittingly to external sites via pop-up windows. Sites that persistently contain those types of ads, which gain clicks through deceptive practices such as fake “close” buttons or misleading warnings, will be affected by the change.
Website admins and owners will have 30 days to fix or remove ads that are flagged. After that, Chrome 71 will protect users by filtering out all ads on offending websites. The new ad filtering feature will be optional but enabled by default. Those who don’t mind seeing the offending ads can manually enable them in browser’s settings tab.

I can’t see this change coming up against too many objections since the sites that use these offending ads often rely primarily or exclusively on them. Google noted that phishing and scam sites sometimes use these methods to swipe your data.
It’s significant that the company will be stopping all ads based on the methods of a given site, not just the offending ads. Honest advertisers might have a few things to say about the change, but it appears Google is clearly hoping that site owners will adjust their advertising practices before that becomes a significant issue.
Source: Google

Chrome may get a new way to share tabs between mobile and desktop, plus incognito media notification changes

In the dark, dank, early days of Android, sending content from your phone to your desktop required either a third-party tool like Pushbullet or Google’s Chrome to Phone and companion Chrome to Mobile extension. Thankfully Chrome switched to a convenient “tab sync” multi-device history that allows you to share sites across devices easily. Even so, it’s not the most direct system, and according to Chrome Story, a “self share” feature that provides a more obvious workflow may be coming to Chrome. Read MoreChrome may get a new way to share tabs between mobile and desktop, plus incognito media notification changes was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google apps may cost EU phone makers as much as $40 per phone

Two days ago, Google unveiled new licensing terms for Android phones and tablets in the European Union, following the EU’s record $5 billion fine. Device manufacturers can now sell phones with heavily-modified builds of Android while also producing normal Android devices with the Play Store, and some apps (like Chrome and Google Search) are now separate licenses. According to a report from The Verge, device makers are still strongly incentivized to ship Search and Chrome, or they could pay as much as $40 per device for access to the Play Store. Read MoreGoogle apps may cost EU phone makers as much as $40 per phone was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Chrome for Android to end support for Jelly Bean

Android Jelly Bean debuted nearly six years ago in November 2012, and it’s currently the oldest version of Android still getting Chrome updates. That looks to be changing soon, though, according to a new commit spotted by XDA Developers.

The commit’s description puts it pretty bluntly: “Update UI for unsupported Android OS and make Jelly Bean unsupported.” There’s no timeline for the change, but once it takes effect, Android KitKat will replace Jelly Bean as the oldest version still supported by Chrome. Read MoreChrome for Android to end support for Jelly Bean was written by the awesome team at Android Police.